Teaching Undergraduates is a Privilege


It is the time of year when we will soon be sending undergraduates out into the world to be Registered Nurses. They will be caring for our friends, neighbors, and one day each of us. Most are young, enthusiastic, and ready to provide excellent nursing care to the sick and the dying. They will work to prevent illness, educate new moms on how to care for their babies and provide comfort to those that are grieving. And they will do so much more.

It is the undergraduate that comes in believing anything the professor tells them and leaves with the ability to call the same professor on a mistake, a misquote, or for being a little too arrogant. The undergraduate will be your biggest fan as the years pass, but may not recognize how much you offered them at the time of graduation. They are also the ones that will call you years later to say thank you, or ask for advice, or tell you of their successes. It is the undergraduate that fills your heart with pride.

I think it is an honor and a privilege to teach undergraduates. These young people are entrusted to us by their parents. They trust us to guide and care for them in additions to teaching them. While we see undergraduates as student nurses it is those students that make each of us a little more thoughtful and a lot more humble.

I’m always a little surprised when I hear of faculty that don’t want to teach undergraduates. I know they are more work than graduates students and the courses take up more time on campus, but without undergraduates, we have no graduate programs. It is the undergraduates that keep programs financially viable and if we treat them like the young professionals they will be they will remember us when it is time to return to graduate school. It may be the professor they gave the hardest time that is the one they want to guide their dissertation.

It is also undergraduates that fine-tune one’s teaching skills.  It takes practice to make the complex understandable, to keep the attention of 80 or 100 students, and to know when they are prepared and not. The big lectures, the small clinical, and the remediation are all skills learned and perfected with the undergraduates and what makes graduates seem easier. The main reason I don’t understand why one wouldn’t want to teach undergraduates is that it is in their classes that it is possible to identify future superstars and recruit your next graduate assistant or the student that will carry on your work and take it to the next level.

It is exciting to see student nurses when they first arrive,  but I attend graduation whenever possible because it is even better to see their goals achieved. The happiness on the face of the graduates is a close second only to the look of overwhelming love I can see on the faces of their parents. It is a reminder that what we do for them brings joy.  They then spread that joy to their patients in small ways every day. Life is better when we share the joy.

 

 

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